Programming

December 6, 2006 at 10:28 am | Posted in France 24, Journalists and Directors, Languages, Programming | 29 Comments

Ahead of the launch tonight (on the Internet) and tomorrow (on cable and satellite), here is what you can expect to see on France 24 every day. Note that the times are for Paris (subtract one hour if you are in London, six if you are in New York). These times are also first broadcast times, meaning that the shows are likely to be repeated during the days at regular times.

PRIME-TIME
France 24 will be organized around two prime-time slots: one in the morning from 6 to 9 a.m. and another one in the evening from 7 to 11 p.m. (Paris time). The prime-time in the mornings are anchored by Antoine Cormery in French and Mark Owen in English. In the evening prime-time Sylvain Attal (FR) takes over, and Andrea Sanke for the English version.

NEWS
Every hour, on the hour, a 10-minute news program is expected to be presented live. This program will be repeated every half-hour (with updates if necessary). During the prime-time hours, headlines will be read every 15 minutes.

WEATHER
The weather will follow every newscast, so every half-hour.

MONDAYS TO FRIDAYS
6.20 a.m.: Sport news. Handled by Eurosport.
6.25 a.m.: Zooming. The show takes a different look at a particular issue.
6.40 a.m.: Web News.
7.15 a.m.: Three-minute report on the world’s media and newspapers.
7.20 a.m.: Business news with Stéphanie Antoine (for the French version) and Raphaël Kahane (for the English version). Repeated at 10.00 a.m.

8.20 a.m.: Top story of the day by Gautier Rybinsky (FR) and Robert Parsons (EN).
8.25 a.m.: Lifestyle News.
9.20 a.m.: Cultural news from around the world presented both in French and English by Elizabeth Tchoungui.

10.40 a.m.: Interview of the day presented in French by Sylvain Attal, and in English by Andrea Sanke.

12.15 p.m.: Face-Off. Every day, two journalists from the international press debate the day’s top story. The French debate is presented by Caroline de Camaret, while Mark Owen moderates the English version.
12.45 p.m.: Personalities. Latest news on Hollywood, fashion, etc.

7.15 p.m.: France 24 Debate (test video available here) with two to three guests. Presented in French by Sylvain Attal, and in English by Andrea Sanke. (No debates on Fridays).

MONDAYS
10.15 a.m.: Environment news.

5.10 p.m.: Political magazine presented by Roselyne Febvre (only in French).

TUESDAYS
10.15 a.m.: Health News.

WEDNESDAYS
10.15 a.m.: Scientific news program.

THURSDAYS
10.15 a.m.: Economic Intelligence. Debate on a very competitive issue. Presented by Ali Laïdi. (Every other week).
10.15 a.m.: Caring. Report following humanitarian aid workers. (Every other week).

FRIDAYS
7 p.m.: A one hour show called “The Talk of Paris” presented by Ulysse Gosset. The program is interactive, allowing viewers to send questions and comments to the guests live.

SATURDAYS
6.40 a.m.: Opinions. A quick point of view from an intellectual on the week’s events.
7.40 a.m.: Reporters. International news reports on the ground.

MONDAYS TO SATURDAYS
6.40 a.m.:
The Week In… which looks at the latest news around the world. Mondays are for Europe. Tuesdays for France, Wednesdays for the Americas, Thursdays for Africa, Fridays for the Middle-East and Saturdays for Asia.

Gérard Saint-Paul promoted

September 2, 2006 at 5:52 pm | Posted in France 24, Journalists and Directors, Languages | 1 Comment

Gérard Saint-Paul has been nominated to replace Ulysse Gosset for the position of managing director in charge of news and programming, France 24 announced yesterday.

Saint-Paul will represent the French public television France Televisions on the directing board. Alain de Pouzilhac and Jean-Yves Bonsergent also seat on the board with de Pouzilhac at the head and Bonsergent representing the private company TF1.

Saint-Paul was already working for France 24 since April as the managing news editor overseeing all journalists working for the network.

With this announcement, de Pouzilhac also said that most of the staff for the new international news channel had already been hired. He expects them to start working in the network’s new offices in two weeks.

De Pouzilhac is also confirming that a third feed will be created for France 24 in July 2007. The third feed will broadcast France 24 mainly in Arabic with some programming in French and English.

What languages again?

August 30, 2006 at 11:06 pm | Posted in France 24, Languages | 4 Comments

It has come to my attention that it might not be clear in what languages the network will be available. So let’s clarify things.

Initially, France 24 was supposed to be available over one single feed. On that feed, 20 hours of a day’s programming were to be in French and four hours in English. However, such choice would limit the channel in its plans for expansion (for example, France 24 would be classified as a cultural channel in the United States, thus would be lost in an ethnic package on cable).

Jut over two months ago, France 24’s board of directors decided to request an additional 10 million Euros to enable the creation of a second feed. So the plans today are for France 24 to be available in two versions: one only in French (24 hours a day) and the other one with only four hours in French and the other 20 hours in English.

The English feed would be the only one available in the United States and other non-French speaking regions. As for the French feed, it would be available in France and other regions such as the Middle East where French is a commonly spoken language.

In the following years, France 24 will add Arabic and Spanish. The Arabic language would probably receive one dedicated feed. As for Spanish, it would share the airtime on the English feed.

As for the website, it will be available from the start in French, English and Arabic.

If you have any question you would like to see answered on this blog, do not hesitate to comment or send an e-mail.

Recap

August 22, 2006 at 10:48 am | Posted in France 24, General Information, Geography, Languages | 5 Comments

What do we know so far about France 24? Here is a quick recap on the new international news channel.

France 24 will be broadcast 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

During the first phase of the launch, France 24 will be available in France, Europe (West and East), North Africa, Africa, Middle-East, and in the New York state and Washington D.C. in the United States. In New York, France 24 will target the United Nations and its diplomats. In Washington D.C., in addition to the American leaders, it will also target the International Monetary Fund.

In the second phase, France 24 will be launched in the rest of the American continent (North and South) as well as in Asia.

France 24 targets the leaders of these countries, “the decision makers,” as Alain de Pouzilhac, chairman of the board of director explained during a hearing at the French commission of cultural affairs of the house of representatives.

France 24 will be broadcast in numeric over cable and the Internet.

At the start, the network will have two channels: one in French and the other one in English. In 2007, France 24 will add four hours of Arabic programming to the English channel. It is hoping to add Spanish programming in 2008 or more likely in 2009.

Journalists will be bilingual. They will all speak French and one of the other languages used by France 24: English, Arabic or Spanish (in 2008/2009). Therefore, and since the content on the two channels must be the same, one journalist will be responsible of translating his or her reports in the two main languages used.

France 24 will be available in some hotels where it is broadcast. According to Alain de Pouzilhac, France 24 is already negotiating with large hotel companies to ensure access to their visitors. The network is also hoping to reach airports and some specific airlines.

In North Africa, 90 percent of the audience will be able to view France 24 for free. In other parts of the world, where access to satellites is not free, France 24 will sign partnerships to ensure that it is received.

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